Most of our patients see day-to-day limitations fade away within 2-3 months of knee replacement surgery.

Summary: This graph is a measure of your ability to do normal physical activities (like walking around a grocery store or getting in and out of a car) before a total knee replacement and after a total knee replacement. A higher score is better and means you are more physically able to do daily activities. Most patients see a dramatic increase in their scores from near 40 out of 100 before surgery up to almost 90 out of 100 one year after surgery, representing almost no functional limitations. The vertical line represents the time of surgery.

The graph is a regression of the Activities of Daily Living subscore of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), a 42-item measure of multiple aspects of knee problems from the time before surgery to 360 days after surgery. There are five subscores: Activities of Daily Living, Knee Pain, Sports and Recreation, Knee Symptoms, and Quality of Life. The line is a FIT score—essentially a moving average of all data points (n). For each graph we use SAS programming to generate curves using proc template statgraph.

For total knee replacement, we include procedures with CPT codes 27446 and 27447 and ICD code 81.54. Time period of survey data collected: January 1, 2014 – January 6, 2017.

These graphs include results from all patients who answered the patient-reported outcome questions across Partners HealthCare since 2014. Some patients did not complete these questions either because they were not available at the time or because they chose not to. We are presenting all the outcome information that we have without adjustment, and we believe that the patients who respond are similar to the overall population who had surgery. Keep in mind that these results may not reflect any particular patient’s treatment course and your personal medical history may influence your results.

Our patients report, on average, little to no knee pain one year after surgery.

Summary: This graph measures the severity of your knee pain before a total knee replacement and after a total knee replacement. A higher score means you feel better and have less pain. Most patients see a dramatic increase in their scores from less than 40 out of 100 before surgery up to almost 90 out of 100 one year after surgery, representing very little pain. The vertical line represents the time of surgery.

The graph is a regression of the Pain subscore of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), a 42-item measure of multiple aspects of knee problems from the time before surgery to 360 days after surgery. There are five subscores: Activities of Daily Living, Knee Pain, Sports and Recreation, Knee Symptoms, and Quality of Life. The line is a FIT score—essentially a moving average of all data points (n). For each graph we use SAS programming to generate curves using proc template statgraph.

For total knee replacement, we include procedures with CPT codes 27446 and 27447 and ICD code 81.54. Time period of survey data collected: January 1, 2014 – January 6, 2017.

These graphs include results from all patients who answered the patient-reported outcome questions across Partners HealthCare since 2014. Some patients did not complete these questions either because they were not available at the time or because they chose not to. We are presenting all the outcome information that we have without adjustment, and we believe that the patients who respond are similar to the overall population who had surgery. Keep in mind that these results may not reflect any particular patient’s treatment course and your personal medical history may influence your results.

Most of our patients watch other knee symptoms, like morning stiffness, disappear over the months after surgery.

Summary: This graph measures the severity of symptoms (like stiffness and swelling) before a total knee replacement and after a total knee replacement. A higher score means you feel better and experience fewer or less intense symptoms. Most patients see a dramatic increase in their scores after surgery and often get rid of their symptoms entirely one year after surgery. The vertical line represents the time of surgery.

The graph is a regression of the Symptoms subscore of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), a 42-item measure of multiple aspects of knee problems from the time before surgery to 360 days after surgery. There are five subscores: Activities of Daily Living, Knee Pain, Sports and Recreation, Knee Symptoms, and Quality of Life. The line is a FIT score—essentially a moving average of all data points (n). For each graph we use SAS programming to generate curves using proc template statgraph.

For total knee replacement, we include procedures with CPT codes 27446 and 27447 and ICD code 81.54. Time period of survey data collected: January 1, 2014 – January 6, 2017.

These graphs include results from all patients who answered the patient-reported outcome questions across Partners HealthCare since 2014. Some patients did not complete these questions either because they were not available at the time or because they chose not to. We are presenting all the outcome information that we have without adjustment, and we believe that the patients who respond are similar to the overall population who had surgery. Keep in mind that these results may not reflect any particular patient’s treatment course and your personal medical history may influence your results.

Our patients, on average, have a marked but not complete improvement in their ability to perform strenuous sports or recreation after knee surgery.

Summary: This graph measures your ability to participate in recreational activities and sports (like running or a soccer match) before a total knee replacement and after a total knee replacement. A higher score means you are more able to participate in these athletic activities. Most patients see an increase in their scores from the low 20s out of 100 before surgery to the low 60s out of 100 one year after surgery. This means they are better after surgery but are not easily running, jumping, and twisting, often because they are of an age where those activities are not typical to begin with. The vertical line represents the time of surgery.

The graph is a regression of the Sports subscore of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), a 42-item measure of multiple aspects of knee problems from the time before surgery to 360 days after surgery. There are five subscores: Activities of Daily Living, Knee Pain, Sports and Recreation, Knee Symptoms, and Quality of Life. The line is a FIT score—essentially a moving average of all data points (n). For each graph we use SAS programming to generate curves using proc template statgraph.

For total knee replacement, we include procedures with CPT codes 27446 and 27447 and ICD code 81.54. Time period of survey data collected: January 1, 2014 – January 6, 2017.

These graphs include results from all patients who answered the patient-reported outcome questions across Partners HealthCare since 2014. Some patients did not complete these questions either because they were not available at the time or because they chose not to. We are presenting all the outcome information that we have without adjustment, and we believe that the patients who respond are similar to the overall population who had surgery. Keep in mind that these results may not reflect any particular patient’s treatment course and your personal medical history may influence your results.

Quality of Life Scores for our patients are three to five times higher after knee replacement surgery.

Summary: This graph measures your quality of life before a total knee replacement and after a total knee replacement. A higher score means you have a better quality of life that is less impacted by your knee. Most patients are suffering tremendously before surgery with quality of life scores around 20 out of 100. After surgery, scores improve quickly and dramatically to more than 80 out of 100 nine months after surgery. The vertical line represents the time of surgery.

The graph is a regression of the Quality of Life subscore of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), a 42-item measure of multiple aspects of knee problems from the time before surgery to 360 days after surgery. There are five subscores: Activities of Daily Living, Knee Pain, Sports and Recreation, Knee Symptoms, and Quality of Life. The line is a FIT score—essentially a moving average of all data points (n). For each graph we use SAS programming to generate curves using proc template statgraph.

For total knee replacement, we include procedures with CPT codes 27446 and 27447 and ICD code 81.54. Time period of survey data collected: January 1, 2014 – January 6, 2017.

These graphs include results from all patients who answered the patient-reported outcome questions across Partners HealthCare since 2014. Some patients did not complete these questions either because they were not available at the time or because they chose not to. We are presenting all the outcome information that we have without adjustment, and we believe that the patients who respond are similar to the overall population who had surgery. Keep in mind that these results may not reflect any particular patient’s treatment course and your personal medical history may influence your results.

Most of our patients' physical function scores nearly double after knee replacement surgery

Summary: This graph is a measure of your ability to do normal physical activities (like walking around a grocery store or getting in and out of a car) before a total knee replacement and after a total knee replacement. A higher score is better and means you are more physically able to do daily activities. Most patients see a dramatic increase in their scores from near 40 out of 100 before surgery up to almost 90 out of 100 one year after surgery, representing almost no functional limitations. The vertical line represents the time of surgery.

The graph is a regression of the Activities of Daily Living subscore of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), a 42-item measure of multiple aspects of knee problems from the time before surgery to 360 days after surgery. There are five subscores: Activities of Daily Living, Knee Pain, Sports and Recreation, Knee Symptoms, and Quality of Life. The line is a FIT score—essentially a moving average of all data points (n). For each graph we use SAS programming to generate curves using proc template statgraph.

For total knee replacement, we include procedures with CPT codes 27446 and 27447 and ICD code 81.54. Time period of survey data collected: January 1, 2014 – January 6, 2017.

These graphs include results from all patients who answered the patient-reported outcome questions across Partners HealthCare since 2014. Some patients did not complete these questions either because they were not available at the time or because they chose not to. We are presenting all the outcome information that we have without adjustment, and we believe that the patients who respond are similar to the overall population who had surgery. Keep in mind that these results may not reflect any particular patient’s treatment course and your personal medical history may influence your results.